Rebooting Capitalism Podcast

Rebooting Capitalism is a podcast that digs into why traditional capitalism is broken and what people are doing to fix it.

We hope our guests and topics will inform and inspire others to use business as a force for good. 

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Episodes

Ep #51: Sustainability in the Textile Industry with Graham Stewart of Fibre52

Graham Stewart is the Executive Vice-President of Fibre52, a revolutionary company in the fabric industry. Their patent-pending prepare for dye (PFD) and dye technology is cost-effective, low-impact, and eco-conscious and retains cotton’s natural properties resulting in a stronger, kinder fabric. He joins me this week to share his career journey in the textile industry, how he got into the sustainable side of cotton, and what Fibre52 is all about.

There is no better time for the textile and clothing industry to make the necessary changes in terms of sustainability and do so in a way that benefits every point of the supply chain. Consumers are becoming more aware of greenwashing and social washing, and they are calling companies out on the changes they need to make. So how can the industry do the right thing and profit too?

Graham Stewart is the Executive Vice-President of Fibre52, a revolutionary company in the fabric industry. Their patent-pending prepare for dye (PFD) and dye technology is cost-effective, low-impact, and eco-conscious and retains cotton’s natural properties resulting in a stronger, kinder fabric. He joins me this week to share his career journey in the textile industry, how he got into the sustainable side of cotton, and what Fibre52 is all about.

Join us this week as Graham and I discuss why textile manufacturers struggle to balance sustainability with profitability and how Fibre52 has hacked the cotton-dyeing process to contribute to the circular economy. Hear some of the struggles Graham has observed while working in the industry that made him turn to a more sustainable option and his advice for other textile manufacturers who are looking at becoming more sustainable at what they do.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How our struggle for fashion is harming the environment.
  • What circular economy is and how the Fibre52 dyeing process helps contribute to it.
  • How textile manufacturers struggle to balance sustainability with profitability.
  • Some of the sustainability struggles in the textile industry.
  • How consumers can put pressure on manufacturers to carry out more sustainable practices.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #50: Upcycling Your Food Waste with Marina Duchesneau from the Upcycled Food Association

Marina Duchesneau is the Global Business Development Manager for the Upcycled Food Association, a non-profit focused on fighting food waste and driving change. She has been obsessed with food and the environment from an early age and has really followed her passion in her career. She has a passion for food and making the biggest positive environmental impact possible, and she joins me this week to share more about the incredible work the Upcycled Food Association does in the world.

We all know food waste is a thing, but most folks don’t realize that the U.S. discards more food than any other country in the world. Nearly 40% of all of our food is wasted, and if we fight food waste as a whole, we can really drive climate change away. There’s a lot to be done, but it can have a major impact, and for every company that makes food, there is always a level or area of opportunity to utilize everything you have.

Marina Duchesneau is the Global Business Development Manager for the Upcycled Food Association, a non-profit focused on fighting food waste and driving change. She has been obsessed with food and the environment from an early age and has really followed her passion in her career. She has a passion for food and making the biggest positive environmental impact possible, and she joins me this week to share more about the incredible work the Upcycled Food Association does in the world.

Tune in this week to hear more about food waste and how it is a humanitarian concern and driver of climate change. We’re digging into the upcycled food movement, what upcycled food is, and how your business can either supply or use upcycled ingredients, as well as what you can do as an individual to upcycle your food scraps.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Some examples of upcycled foods.
  • The types of waste Marina sees in the food industry.
  • Some options for businesses to think about if they want to use upcycled ingredients.
  • How the Upcycled Food Association has diverted almost 1 billion pound of waste since launching their certification program.
  • The opportunities larger companies have to maximize profits while driving food back into the human supply chain.
  • How to feed more people with upcycled food.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #49: Making the Switch to Recycled Plastic with Phil Shuttlewood from Social Plastic

Plastic Bank is a social, economic, and environmental enterprise designed to build and support ethical recycling ecosystems in underdeveloped communities. Phil Shuttlewood joins me to share more about their work in areas with high levels of pollution, poverty, and unemployment and how they fight to educate people on plastic pollution in oceans while simultaneously working to resolve high poverty levels in developing countries.

Did you know that 12 billion kilos of plastic end up in the oceans every year? The effects of this plastic waste spread far and wide. But there are also so many incredible things leveraged from recycling this plastic and using it in business production. This week’s guest is here to share more about how to make the switch to recycled plastic.

This week I’m joined by Phil Shuttlewood from Plastic Bank. Plastic Bank is a social, economic, and environmental enterprise designed to build and support ethical recycling ecosystems in underdeveloped communities. He joins me to share more about their work in areas with high levels of pollution, poverty, and unemployment and how they fight to educate people on plastic pollution in oceans while simultaneously working to resolve high poverty levels in developing countries.

Join us this week to hear more about Plastic Bank, what it is, how Phil got involved with the company, and some of the incredible work they do. Learn some of the challenges that come with making the switch to recycled plastic, how companies can easily make the switch to recycled ocean plastic, and the amazing benefits of doing so.

What You’ll Learn:

  • What PCR is.
  • A great way to lower and reduce your carbon footprint.
  • Why plastic itself isn’t the problem, and what the real issue is.
  • How existing illnesses can have causes traced back to plastic consumption.
  • Why the Plastic Bank is a truly unique solution.
  • How recycled plastic can really make a difference in human’s life.
  • Some things to think about if you’re using virgin plastic in your business production.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #48: ESG & Sustainability Trends with Julien Gervereau

Julien Gervereau is the Director of Sustainability here at Sensiba San Filippo and he works with me in our work to help businesses shift from shareholder to stakeholder-driven companies and make business a force for good. He joins me to talk all things ESG and sustainability.

For the last few months, I’ve been to a number of different conferences, trade shows, and events. These events are amazing because the most relevant, up-to-date concepts around sustainability, ESG and climate are all being discussed and shared by attendees, as well as current trends about where the industry is going. This week’s guest joins me to share more about our experiences.

Julien Gervereau is the Director of Sustainability here at Sensiba San Filippo and he works with me in our work to help businesses shift from shareholder to stakeholder-driven companies and make business a force for good. He joins me to talk all things ESG and sustainability.

In this episode, we talk about the trends we’ve been hearing about in the conferences we’ve attended these last few months, and some common threads and themes we see going into 2023. We share what we see coming down the pipeline in the ESG and sustainability world, some of the important things we should be looking at and some takeaways and key learnings from these events.

What You’ll Learn:

  • What ESG and some other key acronyms mean.
  • The importance of looking at the entire ESG continuum when evaluating any organization.
  • What greenwashing, social washing and brandwagoning are and some examples of them.
  • Some trends in sustainability and what we might want to see in 2023.
  • How sustainability is making accounting attractive to people entering the market.
  • Where to start if you want to start measuring your metrics.
  • A dangerous place for a company to be in this day and age.
  • Why these events are so important in the sustainability world.
  • Three scopes you can use to measure your carbon footprint.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #47: The Truth About Eco Bitcoin Mining William Szamosszegi

William Szamosszegi is the CEO and founder of Sazmining Inc, a cryptocurrency mining developer and consulting firm whose platform makes it easy for anybody to start participating in bitcoin mining with renewable energy or carbon-negative energy sources. He joins me this week to share why he truly believes bitcoin mining improves the way humanity relates to energy and money and why the mainstream narrative around bitcoin mining is disconnected from the truth of it.

Bitcoin and the mining of it can feel like an ominous entity, and it can be difficult to understand the topic in depth. There has been some bad press around bitcoin mining lately, but this week’s guest is shifting the narrative around it and is here to share why bitcoin mining, contrary to what many people think, is the strongest lever we have as a society to combat climate change.

William Szamosszegi is the CEO and founder of Sazmining Inc, a cryptocurrency mining developer and consulting firm whose platform makes it easy for anybody to start participating in bitcoin mining with renewable energy or carbon-negative energy sources. He joins me this week to share why he truly believes bitcoin mining improves the way humanity relates to energy and money and why the mainstream narrative around bitcoin mining is disconnected from the truth of it.

Listen in this week as we dive deeper into what bitcoin mining is, how it works, and why it is actually so revolutionary for the environment. We’re looking at the myths and common misconceptions around bitcoin mining, how bitcoin mining and clean energy intersect, and the social aspect of digital currency and how it can provide financial freedom for many refugees around the world.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How much energy around the world today is wasted and the reason why.
  • Why there is so much value in having Bitcoin function the way it does.
  • The importance of making bitcoin mining accessible for people around the world.
  • When the last bitcoin is likely to be mined.
  • How Bitcoin can give financial freedom.
  • What William sees as the future of the world of bitcoin mining.
  • How digital current mining can be done without large energy usage.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #46: Finding Investors for Your Mission with Bahruz Mammadov

Bahruz Mammadov is the CEO and Co-founder of BERKM, a materials company that uses clay-based additives to reduce the use of single-use plastics from about 3.8 million to 4.8 billion pounds each year. He is a serial entrepreneur with a focus on chemical materials and the chemical materials space, and BERKM is his 3rd project. This week, he joins me to share his journey of building a purpose-driven company, how he was able to raise awareness for his mission, and how he was able to find investors for his company.

Many rebooters out there are thinking of starting their own purpose-driven or mission-driven companies, but don’t know where or how to start. Finding investors can be incredibly difficult, but this week’s guest is here to share his journey, tips, and advice to help inspire all you entrepreneurs out there who are looking to take the plunge.

Bahruz Mammadov is the CEO and Co-founder of BERKM, a materials company that uses clay-based additives to reduce the use of single-use plastics from about 3.8 million to 4.8 billion pounds each year. He is a serial entrepreneur with a focus on chemical materials and the chemical materials space, and BERKM is his 3rd project. This week, he joins me to share his journey of building a purpose-driven company, how he was able to raise awareness for his mission, and how he was able to find investors for his company.

Listen in this week and hear how Bahruz built a mission-driven company and found investors, and how using the purpose behind the product can help you do the same. He shares his advice to help you tell your story in a way that builds awareness and gets investors’ attention, and his foresight for the future of the chemical materials field as well as what we can expect for its impact on the planet.

What You’ll Learn:

  • One of the hardest steps faced by mission-driven and purpose-driven entrepreneurs.
  • Why finding investors can be so difficult for new entrepreneurs.
  • An eye-opening moment I had recently that showed me we need to be doing more for the planet.
  • What to do if you have an idea for a purpose-driven business but are scared to take the plunge.
  • How to take the next step towards a mission-driven business.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #45— How to Use Your Brand for Advocacy with Brad Flowers of Bullhorn Creative

Brad Flowers is the Co-Founder and Partner at Bullhorn Creative, a certified B-Corp business-to-business branding agency. He joins me this week to share how companies can authentically use their brand for advocacy without seeming like they’re jumping on the brandwagon or greenwashing, and we’re diving deeper into all things brand advocacy.

Many companies over the last three years have struggled with the common dilemma of using their brand for advocacy. Some brands have stepped out and been called out, while others kept quiet for fear of backlash and getting canceled in this new cancel culture. So what is the right thing for businesses to do when it comes to brand advocacy?

Brad Flowers is the Co-Founder and Partner at Bullhorn Creative, a certified B-Corp business-to-business branding agency. He joins me this week to share how companies can authentically use their brand for advocacy without seeming like they’re jumping on the brandwagon or greenwashing, and we’re diving deeper into all things brand advocacy.

Listen in this week as Brad and I discuss brand advocacy, the right ways to do it, and some examples of brands that are currently doing this well. Brad shares his advice for brands who want to dip their toe in the water of advocacy, what they can do to protect themselves from greenwashing or brandwagoning allegations, and the dangers of backlash in the existing cancel culture.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Where Brad learned the basics of business.
  • Some great examples of what to do and what not to do in your brand.
  • How a brand can recover from making a mistake.
  • What greenwashing, social washing, and impact washing are and why they are so problematic.
  • The importance of images in your brand and the power they can have.
  • What Brad sees as the future of branding.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #44 — Becoming a Climate-Neutral Certified Company with Jamie Richards of Eva NYC

Jamie Richards is the Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability Leader at Eva NYC. Jamie led Eva NYC to being certified as a Climate-Neutral company and is sharing the things she learned and some of her tips and tricks. In this episode, we discuss what it really means to be Climate-Neutral Certified, the things that you might not have thought about when it comes to your environmental impact, and how to start small and build your process for gathering the necessary data to become a Climate-Neutral Certified company.

Maybe you’ve seen the Climate-Neutral logo on products, or heard about climate commitments from larger companies, but do you know what that all really means? If you’re not sure, don’t worry—my guest and I are breaking it all down for you in this episode.

This week I’m joined by Jamie Richards, the Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability Leader at Eva NYC. Jamie led Eva NYC to being certified as a Climate-Neutral company and is sharing the things she learned and some of her tips and tricks.

Join Jamie and I as we discuss what it really means to be Climate-Neutral Certified, the things that you might not have thought about when it comes to your environmental impact, and how to start small and build your process for gathering the necessary data to become a Climate-Neutral Certified company.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Why the Climate-Neutral Certification is so tough to obtain.
  • What companies might need to think about when it comes to being sustainable.
  • How to measure your organization’s carbon footprint.
  • Jamie’s definition of carbon neutrality and why she chose to pursue the Climate Neutral Certification.
  • Where to start once you’ve determined you want to pursue a Climate Neutral Certification.
  • What the certification process looks like.
  • Jamie’s tips for getting certified.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #43 — Your Salad’s Supply Chain with Eddy Badrina

Eddy Badrina is the CEO of Eden Green Technology, a vertical farming company that helps the world sustainably grow large amounts of food using less land, water, and energy. With an approach of “Silicon Valley thinking but mainstream America pricing,” their goal is to ensure that everybody everywhere can experience affordable, locally grown food. They are changing the way we farm our food and feed local communities, and Eddy joins me this week to share more about the impact they are creating in their business.

The ability to get fresh produce at a reasonable price year-round is almost impossible for so many Americans, and this supply chain issue is a big problem. How are we supposed to lead healthy lives if we have inadequate access to foods that are healthy, nutritious, affordable, and available to all? This week’s guest might just have the solution.

Eddy Badrina is the CEO of Eden Green Technology, a vertical farming company that helps the world sustainably grow large amounts of food using less land, water, and energy. With an approach of “Silicon Valley thinking but mainstream America pricing,” their goal is to ensure that everybody everywhere can experience affordable, locally grown food. They are changing the way we farm our food and feed local communities, and Eddy joins me this week to share more about the impact they are creating in their business.

Listen in this week as we’re digging into state-of-the-art greenhouses, sustainable farming, and creating a greater yield with a much smaller footprint. Eddy shares his personal journey into conscious capitalism, the biggest difference between Eden Green and their competitors, and what he sees as the future of sustainable farming and agriculture.

What You’ll Learn:

  • One of the probable reasons for the obesity epidemic in America.
  • The difference between exploitative, ethical, and redemptive organizations.
  • How the pandemic heightened awareness of the need to solve the supply chain problem.
  • What grows best in these vertical greenhouses.
  • How local changes can affect a global perspective.
  • The psychological decisions of consumers that drive the demand that Eden Green needs to meet.
  • Some startling statistics behind farming and food miles.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #42 — Climate & Sustainability-Related Disclosures

Many of you have seen a lot of buzz about the SEC’s new rulings for public companies. These new rules require public companies to list their climate disclosures on registration statements, financial statements, and period reports. These rules will affect business owners, CFOs, and accountants – particularly audit folks – among many more.

Many of you have seen a lot of buzz about the SEC’s new rulings for public companies. These new rules require public companies to list their climate disclosures on registration statements, financial statements, and period reports. These rules will affect business owners, CFOs, and accountants – particularly audit folks – among many more.

Your guest this week? It’s me. These changes are coming folks, and they’re coming quick! We have to start looking into this and taking action now. I’m diving deeper into all the interesting sustainability-related disclosures in the pipelines both on a federal and state level.

Join me this week as I’m giving you an overview of what these rules are and what they’re going to mean for you and your business, or those businesses you work with. Hear why you need to start preparing for these rules and having these conversations now, and how to start cleaning up any risks or things you don’t like ahead of these regulations.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The three different scopes that climate emissions come in.
  • How public and private companies will be affected by these changes.
  • The similar rules the SEC may implement on human capital disclosures.
  • Some examples of what you can start doing to prepare your business for these rule changes.
  • What businesses in California and businesses who work with those in California need to know about these changes.
  • How these changes are going to affect the work of accountants and auditors.
  • Some of the changes that will hit both public and private companies.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #41 — Benefit Corporations with Jonathan Storper

Jonathan Storper, Partner at Hanson Bridgett

Jonathan Storper is a corporate transactions attorney and has been practicing law for over 35 years. He formed the first certified B-corp law firm, Hanson Bridgett, and had a hand in crafting the benefit corporation guidelines. He joins me this week to share how he got involved in benefit corporations and the history of how it all started.

As you may know, my day job is helping companies certify as B-corps, and one of the biggest hurdles in that process is shifting a business entity type or governance documentation to a benefit corporation model. This week, I’m putting all the myths to bed and addressing the fears of making that shift with the person who helped craft the benefit corporation model.

Jonathan Storper is a corporate transactions attorney and has been practicing law for over 35 years. He formed the first certified B-corp law firm, Hanson Bridgett, and had a hand in crafting the benefit corporation guidelines. He joins me this week to share how he got involved in benefit corporations and the history of how it all started.

Listen in this week as we talk all about benefit corporations, their principles, and some of the implications business owners should be aware of as they go through the shift in process. Hear what a benefit corporation entity type is, why it’s so different from a C-corp or an S-Corp, and the intentions behind the language in the governance documentation that usually trips up folks looking to make the shift.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The basic definition of a certified B-Corp.
  • What it takes for a for-profit corporation to become certified.
  • The difference between a regular corporation, a certified B-Corp and a benefit corporation.
  • Some of the challenges faced by benefit corporations.
  • Why there is no reason a benefit corporation can’t go public.
  • The benefits to making the shift to the benefit corporation model.
  • Jonathan’s vision for the future of sustainability in business.

 

Links Mentioned:

Episode #40 — Open Hiring with Joe Kenner

Joe Kenner, President and CEO of Greyston Bakery in New York

Joe Kenner is the president and CEO of Greyston Bakery in New York, a company known for its unique open hiring model, where no resume is needed to apply and employees are chosen from a list they are placed on when they sign up. Joe became CEO of Greyston in April 2020, right at the beginning of the pandemic, and joins me this week to share more about his experiences with the open hiring model and how it creates a life-changing impact for folks who want to work.

Can you imagine hiring somebody for your business without knowing a single thing about them? You don’t know anything about their past, their experiences, or their skills, you don’t even see their resume before taking them on. The only thing you know is that they signed up to be considered for a job with you.

Joe Kenner is the president and CEO of Greyston Bakery in New York, a company known for its unique open hiring model, where no resume is needed to apply and employees are chosen from a list they are placed on when they sign up. Joe became CEO of Greyston in April 2020, right at the beginning of the pandemic, and joins me this week to share more about his experiences with the open hiring model and how it creates a life-changing impact for folks who want to work.

In this episode, hear more about Greyston’s open hiring model, what it entails, and how its inclusive approach is a shining example of how business can be a force for good. Joe shares why he believes that open hiring is a revolutionary, radical new way of looking at work and the future of it, and what he would say to employers who are hesitant about this type of hiring.

What You’ll Learn:

  • One of the reasons Greyston was founded.
  • Why open hiring doesn’t get rid of or compromise standards.
  • Some other companies who are doing similar things.
  • What Joe sees as the future of inclusive hiring.
  • The benefits of open hiring.
  • Greyston’s core values and how they are interwoven into the hiring approach.

 

Links Mentioned:

Episode #39 — Making THE Simple Switch with Rachel Kois

Rachel Kois, Founder & CEO of Simple Switch

Rachel Kois is the founder and CEO of Simple Switch, an online marketplace for ethical and sustainable shopping and an eco-friendly alternative to Amazon. Labeled “Amazon with a heart”, Simple Switch is a way for you to shop easily online for anything you need, while spending money in alignment with your values. Its mission is to make the normal online shopping we do be a force for good in the world, and make the idea of people voting with their dollar easily accessible to everyone, not just those who are more ecologically conscious.

Many consumers are starting to be more conscious about what they are buying, and want to know more about where their products are coming from. We want to do better and shop in a sustainable way, but with the convenience of a company like Amazon, it can feel more difficult than we would like. Luckily, I have just the solution for you this week.

Rachel Kois is the founder and CEO of Simple Switch, an online marketplace for ethical and sustainable shopping and an eco-friendly alternative to Amazon. Labeled “Amazon with a heart”, Simple Switch is a way for you to shop easily online for anything you need, while spending money in alignment with your values. Its mission is to make the normal online shopping we do be a force for good in the world, and make the idea of people voting with their dollar easily accessible to everyone, not just those who are more ecologically conscious.

Simple Switch is a gamechanger in the impact space, so join us this week to hear some of the incredible work Rachel is doing in her business, and why she believes it is the future of sustainable retail. Hear how Simple Switch creates an equitable and impactful economy for all involved – from the folks making the products to the folks buying them – and why making a positive impact doesn’t have to be difficult.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How Simple Switch is tackling acceptability to using online shopping as a positive impact.
  • Why Rachel doesn’t believe in guilting or shaming people into change.
  • The personal consumer commitment Rachel made with regards to her spending and buying from companies.
  • Where greenwashing comes from and why it’s such a problem.
  • Rachel’s biggest challenge in her business journey.
  • How easy it is to fall into imposter syndrome as a woman entrepreneur.
  • Some common challenges faced by women entrepreneurs.

Links Mentioned:

Episode #38 — Battling Pain & Shame in Society with Sadie Lincoln

Sadie Lincoln, Co-founder & CEO of barre3

Sadie Lincoln is the co-founder and CEO of barre3, a fitness company focused on teaching people to be balanced in body and empowered from within. What started as a workout has blossomed into a full-blown movement made up of millions of people focused on body positivity, being empowered, and redefining what success in fitness means. Tune in this week as we dive into pain and shame, and hopefully come out on the other side with love and acceptance.

There are three letters in ESG. We spend a lot of time on the show talking about the environment and the governance, but we need to equally address the S… the social issues that society needs to repair because, without all three, none of it can be successful. My guest this week has been addressing an issue every single human can identify with: self-love, particularly in the fitness world, where pain and shame dominate.

Sadie Lincoln is the co-founder and CEO of barre3, a fitness company focused on teaching people to be balanced in body and empowered from within. What started as a workout has blossomed into a full-blown movement made up of millions of people focused on body positivity, being empowered, and redefining what success in fitness means.

Tune in this week as Sadie and I dive into pain and shame, and hopefully come out on the other side with love and acceptance. This discussion may seem a little bit different to what you’re used to on the show, but hang with us because we’re showing you the social issues perpetuated by the fitness industry, and the connections between dropping pain and shame, and Rebooting Capitalism.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Why we cannot work to reboot anything without embracing love and acceptance.
  • The connection between Rebooting Capitalism and addressing pain and shame in society.
  • How Sadie was silently suffering with body image issues and chronic pain as she navigated the fitness industry.
  • When the conditioning started that has left so many people believing in concepts like before and after and no pain, no gain.
  • How barre3 is striving to change the pain and shame mentality that runs through the fitness industry.
  • The specific pain and shame Sadie sees in the fitness industry that she’s trying to address, from body image to eating disorders.
  • How Sadie has discovered the majority of people interact with fitness, and how barre3 creates a service that accounts for them.

Links Mentioned:

 

Episode #37 — Banking Your Values with Felicia Manullang of Amalgamated Bank

Felicia Manullang, Vice President, Amalgamated Bank

Listen in this week and hear about how Amalgamated works, what makes Amalgamated different from other banks, and how it shows hope for the banking world. Felicia shares what it means to bank your values, how Amalgamated creates a positive cycle with the funds deposited, and how it creates a more fair and equitable society.

    • Do you know what your bank does with your money after you deposit it? Being intentional about where your money goes has so many benefits, and there are banks out there that deploy capital mindfully and empower communities while creating a positive change in the world. This week’s guest joins me to talk about one of them.Felicia Manullang is the first vice-president at Amalgamated Bank, the largest B Corp bank in the U.S. Amalgamated Bank has grown to support thousands of people, organizations, causes, and businesses that are truly committed to improving the world we live.Tune in this week and hear about how Amalgamated works, what makes Amalgamated different from other banks, and how it shows hope for the banking world. Felicia shares what it means to bank your values, how Amalgamated creates a positive cycle with the funds deposited, and how it creates a more fair and equitable society.What You’ll Learn:
      • What banks really need to do to make a sustainable change in the world.
      • How Felicia is following her purpose with her work.
      • Why the place you deposit your money matters.
      • The benefits of banking your values.
      • What Felicia wants everybody to know about sustainable banking.
      • Where banks can start to make a shift to make an impact.
      • The future of sustainability and ESG in banking.
      • Why sustainability is easy to say and harder to do, and what it really requires.

      Links Mentioned:

Episode #36 — Treating Employees Well with Michelle Hirons

Michelle Hirons, Founder & CEO, HireRing

Listen in this week and hear how Michelle treats employees well in her company and what she finds to be so fantastic about working in the purpose-driven space. Hear the ESOPs, 0% loans, and remediation programs she offers her employees, and her advice for any other business owners looking to implement these things in their own companies.

With the employee pool shrinking and attrition rates rising, it’s time for companies to take a hard look at how they’re treating their employees. This week’s guest joins me to share what she is doing in her business to treat her employees well in a competitive market, and how you can do the same in your business.

Most folks are familiar with the standard staffing agency, but Michelle Hirons is bringing something new to the game. She is the co-founder and CEO of HigherRing, a staffing agency that operates just a little bit differently when it comes to staffing its clients. They do outsourced business operations for companies in the purpose-driven space and she ensures that all her staff use their powers for good.

Listen in this week and hear how Michelle treats employees well in her company and what she finds to be so fantastic about working in the purpose-driven space. Hear the ESOPs, 0% loans, and remediation programs she offers her employees, and her advice for any other business owners looking to implement these things in their own companies.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The various staffing models Michelle’s company work with.
  • How Michelle nurtures the culture of a strong-impact business while working remotely.
  • Why there is always a need for personal outreach for people.
  • Some of the things she is doing in her business that really make a difference.
  • The importance of paying a decent salary for employees.
  • What Michelle sees as the future of employee demands.
  • How her way of working has changed since the pandemic.

Links Mentioned:

Ep #35: ESG Investing with Matthew Blume, Head of the ESG Research and Shareholder Advocacy at Pekin Hardy Strauss Wealth ManagementEpisode #35 — ESG Investing with Matthew Blume

Matthew Blume, Head of the ESG Research and Shareholder Advocacy at Pekin Hardy Strauss Wealth Management

In this episode Matthew gives us the lowdown on ESG investing, ESG rated funds, and the various socially responsible investing options. He touches on which companies face more pressure to be transparent in their ESGs, which types of funds perform best, and he even shares some resources for learning about your current investments.

Do you know what you own? When you contribute to your 401K, do you know what that money gets invested in? More consumers are starting to ask these questions, and today’s guest is the perfect person to help guide them.

Matthew Blume is the head of the ESG Research and Shareholder Advocacy work at Pekin Hardy Strauss Wealth Management. There’s currently no standardization of Environment and Social Governance goals, so Matthew is helping us understand what to look for in companies that we may want to invest in or even purchase from.

Listen in this week as Matthew gives us the lowdown on ESG investing, ESG rated funds, and the various socially responsible investing options. He touches on which companies face more pressure to be transparent in their ESGs, which types of funds perform best, and he even shares some resources for learning about your current investments. If you’re an at-home investor looking to put your money where your values are, Matthew is providing the expertise and advice to do just that.

What You’ll Learn:

  • What an ESG and an ESG rated fund is.
  • How ESG rated funds are rated.
  • Why it’s a myth that ESG funds don’t perform as well as traditional funds.
  • Matthew’s advice for at-home investors who want to align their investments with their values.
  • How companies can attract more investors.
  • What Matthew sees for the future of sustainable business.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast - Episode 34 - Sustainable Ranching with Jeanne CarverEpisode #34 — Sustainable Ranching with Jeanne Carver

Jeanne Carver, Shaniko Wool Company

In this episode, you’ll hear the incredible story of how a small, anonymous sheep ranch in Oregon wound up providing the wool that has been worn by the first lady of the United States and used in the official Olympic uniforms for Team USA. Jeanne Carver of Shaniko Wool Company shares what she believes to be the future of sustainability and ranching and the impact of having a fully traceable, sustainably produced wool supply.

Contrary to what some might think, farming and ranching can be regenerative. The story behind the traceability of clothes and textiles is so much deeper and richer than merely knowing where your clothes come from and this week’s guest is here to prove it. Get ready for an inspiring story this week.

Jeanne Carver is the co-founder of Shaniko Wool Company, a sheep ranch with a rich 151-year history that is proving that ranching can not only be climate-friendly but climate regenerative. After losing a steady stream of business, Jeanne began to question the sustainability of the family business, until something happened that she could only dream about. She joins me this week to share the fascinating story of her family ranch, unpack the Responsible Wool Standard, and share details about her current carbon management project.

Listen in this week and hear the incredible story of how a small, anonymous sheep ranch in Oregon wound up providing the wool that has been worn by the first lady of the United States and used in the official Olympic uniforms for Team USA. Jeanne shares what she believes to be the future of sustainability and ranching and the impact of having a fully traceable, sustainably produced wool supply.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The life-changing effects of having the power to influence others.
  • Some of the companies Jeanne has supplied her wool to.
  • The impact that sheep have upon the environment and why they are so important to the health of the landscape.
  • How Jeanne is using the data collected to improve sustainability in her business.
  • What Jeanne sees as up next in the future of agriculture.
  • The beauty of traceability.
  • How Jeanne’s sheep ranch became the first ranch in the world to be certified with the Responsible Wool Standard.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 33 – Ranjay Gulati – Harvard Professor and Author of Deep Purpose

Episode #33 — Deep Purpose

Ranjay Gulati, Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and author of Deep Purpose: The Heart and Soul of High-Performance Companies

In this episode, Ranjay shares his story of how he discovered what deep purpose is and how he began to look at his own organizational purpose. We discuss how companies can dedicate themselves more profoundly to purpose-driven leadership and use it to engage with employees on the frontline and how purpose can be pursued in a more thoughtful way that can transform businesses and leadership in general.

We hear leaders talk a lot about purpose, but what does it really mean? What does the pursuit of purpose entail, and how does it enhance businesses both commercially and socially? You can’t brainwash employees with corporate purpose, but you can make it real for them, and that’s where deep purpose comes in.

Ranjay Gulati is a Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and author of Deep Purpose: The Heart and Soul of High-Performance Companies. He joins me this week to share how leaders that have deep purpose think differently and are imagining a very different construct for business than the current economic model.

In this episode, Ranjay shares his story of how he discovered what deep purpose is and how he began to look at his own organizational purpose. We discuss how companies can dedicate themselves more profoundly to purpose-driven leadership and use it to engage with employees on the frontline and how purpose can be pursued in a more thoughtful way that can transform businesses and leadership in general.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The link between purpose, performance, and The Great Resignation.
  • Some examples of purpose-driven companies.
  • The three benefits coming from purpose as an operating system. 
  • How purpose gives you directional clarity and is an orienting system in your life.
  • What Ranjay sees as the future of purpose and sustainability in business.
  • How companies can employ purpose and engage it on all levels to engage employees and retain talent.
  • A pivotal moment in Ranjay’s journey to writing his book on purpose. 

Links Mentioned:

Ranjay Gulati LinkedIn | Website | Book

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 32 – Julien Gervreau, Jackson Family Wines, Rooted for Good

Episode #32 — Rooted for Good

Julien Gervreau, Vice President of Sustainability for Jackson Family Wines

In this episode, Julien shares the four core pillars of the Rooted for Good plan, what will be achieved in each one, and how sustainability has been woven into the company’s culture. He gives some useful advice for getting everyone on your team on board for these goals, how to encourage buy-ins, and how to start a plan like this in your company. Business can be used as a force for good, and Jackson Family Wines is going above and beyond to demonstrate that.

Sustainability initiatives are becoming increasingly important to businesses, but many don’t know where to start. There are lots of factors that contribute to setting and achieving sustainability goals by their deadlines, and Jackson Family Wines has created a plan to achieve their impactful goals by 2030.

Julien Gervreau is the VP of Sustainability at Jackson Family Wines, and he’s responsible for creating their brilliant new initiative, Rooted for Good. Jackson Family Wines is known for its tasty wines, but more recently it is being recognized for its leadership in sustainability and climate action. 

In this episode, Julien shares the four core pillars of the Rooted for Good plan, what will be achieved in each one, and how sustainability has been woven into the company’s culture. He gives some useful advice for getting everyone on your team on board for these goals, how to encourage buy-ins, and how to start a plan like this in your company. Business can be used as a force for good, and Jackson Family Wines is going above and beyond to demonstrate that.

What You Will Learn:

  • What led Julien to create the Rooted for Good initiative.
  • How he got senior management involved in the process of goal setting.
  • What concerns Julien most about offsets.
  • Why building soil health is so important, especially in the wine industry.
  • The biggest challenge he faced in creating this plan.
  • How you can build an initiative like this in your company. 

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 31 – Paul Shapiro,  CEO of The Better Meat Co. and Author of Clean Meat

Episode #31 — Growing Meat without Animals

Paul Shapiro, CEO of The Better Meat Co. and Author of Clean Meat

In this episode, Paul and I discuss the problems with eating animal meat, what alternatives are out there, and why making the shift doesn’t have to be black and white. Paul shares his wealth of knowledge on the link between global sustainability problems and animal meat, and how eating meat is linked to future pandemic risks. This is a controversial topic, but I know you’ll leave this episode feeling more informed and intentional about what you make for dinner.

Did you know that 80% of the world’s agriculture is grown to feed livestock? Or that animal agriculture produces more greenhouse gases than the entire transportation industry? Eating meat has some serious consequences for the environment, and my guest today is offering his advice for preventing them.

Paul Shapiro is the CEO of The Better Meat Co., and author of Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World. Through food tech startups like his, we can depend less on animal meats to quench our “meat tooth” and more on sustainable and delicious alternatives.

In this episode, Paul and I discuss the problems with eating animal meat, what alternatives are out there, and why making the shift doesn’t have to be black and white. Paul shares his wealth of knowledge on the link between global sustainability problems and animal meat, and how eating meat is linked to future pandemic risks. This is a controversial topic, but I know you’ll leave this episode feeling more informed and intentional about what you make for dinner.


What You Will Learn:

  • Why Paul calls his business a food tech startup
  • How the pandemic was a wake up call
  • What to do if you’re scared to cut out meat completely
  • Where Paul sees the future of the clean meat industry
  • Why we are currently in the golden era of meat alternatives
  • How food can be part of the solution to our sustainability problems

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 30 – Leo Bellis-Jones, founder of Ripl Goods

Episode #30 — Causing a Ripple Effect

Leo Bellis-Jones, founder of Ripl Goods

In this episode, Leo shares his story of becoming disenchanted with the world of corporate advertising and what led him to leave that world and start Ripl Goods. We talk about what it was like launching a purpose-driven business during a pandemic, how his job satisfaction has gone through the roof, and how his company is changing our reliance on the plastic water bottle. 

Companies are feeling the pressure to make 180-degree changes to their practices to be more sustainable. But what if they don’t have to make 180-degree changes all at once, and instead, they focus on the ripple effects of small, consistent shifts?

My guest today, Leo Bellis-Jones, believes that even the smallest changes matter. After leaving the world of corporate advertising in search of more meaning and positive impact, he founded Ripl Goods, a company that tackles the cycle of plastic and poverty in Bali. 

In this episode, Leo shares his story of becoming disenchanted with the world of corporate advertising and what led him to leave that world and start Ripl Goods. We talk about what it was like launching a purpose-driven business during a pandemic, how his job satisfaction has gone through the roof, and how his company is changing our reliance on the plastic water bottle. 


What You Will Learn:

  • What peaked Leo’s interest in the power of business to do good.
  • How his days look now compared to when he was in advertising.
  • What inspired him to start Ripl Goods.
  • How small steps over time can lead to major systemic changes. 
  • Why it’s hard to convince people to take actions that positively affect the ocean.
  • Some ideas for companies who want to start incorporating sustainability. 


Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 29 – Scott Anderson from Sensiba San Filippo

Episode #29 — Accounting & Sustainability

Scott Anderson, CPA and Audit Partner at Sensiba San Filippo 

In this episode, Scott and I dig into the importance of non-financial metrics and sustainability disclosures, the data these metrics provide businesses with, and how he helps businesses benchmark this data. We discuss the different sustainability frameworks currently used and how implementing one of these frameworks will benefit your business right now and in the future.

When most people think of accounting, they think about numbers and finances. What they don’t know is that we are seeing a massive shift in reporting and disclosure to include sustainability metrics and this can be hugely beneficial not just for the planet but for businesses too.

My guest today, Scott Anderson, is the perfect person to talk about this with because he helps businesses report on their finance metrics as well as these sustainability disclosures. As an audit partner here at Sensiba San Filippo, Scott has some great insights on the different frameworks that guide business reporting and where this shift will take us down the road.

In this episode, Scott and I dig into the importance of non-financial metrics and sustainability disclosures, the data these metrics provide businesses with, and how he helps businesses benchmark this data. We discuss the different sustainability frameworks currently used and how implementing one of these frameworks will benefit your business right now and in the future.

What You Will Learn:

  • The difference between financial and non-financial metrics.
  • Why non-financial metrics are crucial to understand the health of a business. 
  • Why Scott thinks it’s unfortunate that the most well-known aspect of sustainability is climate change.
  • The benefits of sustainability disclosures.
  • Some of the many different sustainability frameworks. 
  • Why tracking sustainability KPIs now can benefit the sale of your business in the future. 

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 28 – Elizabeth Pearce from SymSoil

Episode #28 — Save The Soil

Elizabeth Pearce, Founder and CEO of SymSoil

In this episode, Elizabeth shares why the diminishing layer of topsoil is a major concern not just for farmers, but for all humans. She explains the science behind regenerative agriculture and how we’re damaging the topsoil, as well as some ways that the average person can support regeneration efforts. We depend on topsoil for nearly all of the world’s food production, so if there was ever a time to get your hands dirty for a cause, this is it.

95% of our food is grown in the uppermost layer of soil, also known as topsoil. However, this critical component of our food system is rapidly disappearing, making the future of food production on this planet unknown. 

Luckily, my guest today is here to spread awareness about this problem and offer some practical solutions we can all use to save the earth’s topsoil. Elizabeth Pearce is the founder and CEO of SymSoil, a soil health company with products that improve soil quality and increase profitability for farmers. 

In this episode, Elizabeth shares why the diminishing layer of topsoil is a major concern not just for farmers, but for all humans. She explains the science behind regenerative agriculture and how we’re damaging the topsoil, as well as some ways that the average person can support regeneration efforts. We depend on topsoil for nearly all of the world’s food production, so if there was ever a time to get your hands dirty for a cause, this is it.

What You Will Learn:

  • How Elizabeth started on her dirty journey.
  • What regenerative agriculture is and why topsoil is so important.
  • What climate drawdown is.
  • 3 SymSoil products that are addressing this problem.
  • The real culprit of our disappearing topsoil.
  • 3 ways we can support the regeneration of topsoil from home. 

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 27 – Jenn Diesi from Geek Girl Tech

Episode #27 — Sustainable Data Security

Jenn Diesi, founder and owner of Geek Girl Tech

In this episode, Jenn shares why small businesses struggle to get sufficient data security and how they can access it, why she sees data security as a human right, and how everyday people can become better stewards of our privacy. Jenn believes you cannot be a socially conscious company without caring for your employees’ and clients’ data, so she’s sharing her advice for both business owners and consumers to improve their privacy and security efforts. 

Data security is a hot topic for business owners and the customers they serve. With new hacks and attacks reported daily, being good stewards of the data we share and collect is crucial if we want to be socially responsible.

My guest today is Jenn Diesi, the founder and owner of Geek Girl Tech. Jenn and her team show small to mid-sized businesses how to collect and store data with sustainability in mind. She has a wealth of knowledge on this topic, one that is growing in importance as more and more households contain listening devices, so she is the perfect person to speak on it. 

In today’s episode, Jenn shares why small businesses struggle to get sufficient data security and how they can access it, why she sees data security as a human right, and how everyday people can become better stewards of our privacy. Jenn believes you cannot be a socially conscious company without caring for your employees’ and clients’ data, so she’s sharing her advice for both business owners and consumers to improve their privacy and security efforts. 

What You Will Learn:

  • Why Jenn sees data security as a human right.
  • The negative consequences of our data being collected.
  • How employers put their employees at risk with bad data security decisions.
  • How to be better stewards of the data we collect at work.
  • What you should do if you think you’ve been hacked.
  • The easiest thing you can do to protect your data and security.


Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep. 26 – Lauren Olson from World Centric

Episode #26 — Compost Responsibly

Lauren Olson, Zero Waste Manager at World Centric

In this episode, Lauren and I dive into the evil world of single use plastics and look at the alternatives in our ever-increasing takeout environment. The pandemic has made many of our eco-friendly habits harder to follow, but there are still things we can do to help the planet. Lauren shares best practices for knowing when to throw out an object, recycle it, or compost it, and what businesses can do today to reduce their plastic pollution.

1 million plastic utensils are used in the United States each day. Single use plastics like these typically outlive the person who used them, adding to the monstrous amount of plastic waste in our landfills and natural ecosystems.

Lauren Olson is the Zero Waste Manager at World Centric, a company making major strides in solving this problem. World Centric manufactures the only compostable food service and packaging products. Not only are they making it possible to replace single waste plastics, but they’re lightening the load for recycling plants.

In this episode, Lauren and I dive into the evil world of single use plastics and look at the alternatives in our ever-increasing takeout environment. The pandemic has made many of our eco-friendly habits harder to follow, but there are still things we can do to help the planet. Lauren shares best practices for knowing when to throw out an object, recycle it, or compost it, and what businesses can do today to reduce their plastic pollution.

Learn:

  • Why petroleum-based plastics are so evil.
  • How much of the plastic we recycle actually gets recycled.
  • Why recycling plastics isn’t the ultimate solution.
  • What microplastics are and why they’re so dangerous.
  • What businesses can do to reduce their plastic pollution,
  • The number one myth about composting that Lauren wants to dispel.

Links Mentioned: 

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 25 – Sean Greenwood, Ben & Jerry's

Episode #25 — If It’s Melted, It’s Ruined

Sean Greenwood, Grand Poobah of Public Relations at Ben & Jerry’s

In this episode, Sean and I discuss all the different ways Ben & Jerry’s is more than just a beloved ice cream business, and how it’s possible for a company to make a profit while doing the right thing. He shares some of the ways they’re working to make their supply chain more sustainable, their workforce more diverse, and how they use their platform to hold the government accountable. No company is perfect, but Ben & Jerry’s continues to set the bar high for sustainable businesses.

We all know Ben & Jerry’s for their delicious ice cream pints that come in a number of wacky, mouth-watering, and socially-charged flavors. But besides making ice cream, they’re also using their brand to change the world.

My guest today, Sean Greenwood, is the Grand Poobah of PR at Ben & Jerry’s, and he’s the perfect person to talk to about the amazing example Ben & Jerry’s sets for other businesses to become more sustainable and socially responsible. From their 3-prong mission statement to how they plan on improving their DEI efforts, Sean is here to give us the scoop.

In this episode, Sean and I discuss all the different ways Ben & Jerry’s is more than just a beloved ice cream business, and how it’s possible for a company to make a profit while doing the right thing. He shares some of the ways they’re working to make their supply chain more sustainable, their workforce more diverse, and how they use their platform to hold the government accountable. No company is perfect, but Ben & Jerry’s continues to set the bar high for sustainable businesses.

What You Will Learn:

  • How Ben & Jerry’s is for profit and for social and environmental impact.
  • What link prosperity is and why it’s essential to their core.
  • Why Ben & Jerry’s activism is not the same as cause-related marketing.
  • The fascinating story of their Pecan Resist ice cream flavor.
  • How they’re addressing DEI initiatives and why they still need improvement.
  • Sean’s advice for other businesses that want to shift to a more mission-driven model.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 24 – Tim Greiner

Episode #24 — Sustainable Supply Chains

Tim Greiner, Co-founder and Managing Director at Pure Strategies 

In this episode, find out why assessing your supply chain for sustainability is so important and how to decide which metrics to assess it for. Having this conversation with your suppliers can be challenging, so Tim shares how to make it easy and mutually beneficial. We talk about the benefits of working to create a more sustainable supply chain, and what you can do to start the shift today. 

Companies in every industry are making the shift to become more sustainable and ethical. This shift forces them to look at their supply chain and acknowledge where it could improve.  

My guest today, Tim Greiner, helps businesses transform their supply chains, engage with suppliers, improve protocols and identify risks. Making environmental, social, and ethical changes to your supply chain doesn’t have to be overwhelming with the help of Tim’s team at Pure Strategies. 

In this episode, find out why assessing your supply chain for sustainability is so important and how to decide which metrics to assess it for. Having this conversation with your suppliers can be challenging, so Tim shares how to make it easy and mutually beneficial. We talk about the benefits of working to create a more sustainable supply chain, and what you can do to start the shift today. 

Learn: 

  • How companies can decide what to screen their suppliers for
  • The benefits of working towards a more sustainable supply chain
  • How companies can start this conversation with their suppliers 
  • How to hold suppliers accountable
  • Tim’s recommendations for supply chain management software

Links Mentioned: 

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 23 – Simon Mainwaring

Episode #23 — We First Marketing

Simon Mainwaring, New York Times Bestselling author and CEO of We First

In this episode, Simon breaks down how 2020 changed the world of business messaging and marketing, and why consumers are so distrustful of brands right now. He shares how businesses can be part of meaningful social conversations authentically and how to make their processes and culture more aligned with the impact they want to have.

In 2020, we saw social movements change the way businesses show up internally and externally. The pandemic and BLM both ignited newfound pressure on corporations from consumers to show up, say something, and make an impact.

We First Branding is a creative consultancy group that works with the world’s most successful brands on how to lead the future through impact. CEO Simon Mainwaring urges brands to engage in meaningful storytelling in their messaging and to seriously assess where they can improve. 

In this episode, Simon breaks down how 2020 changed the world of business messaging and marketing, and why consumers are so distrustful of brands right now. He shares how businesses can be part of meaningful social conversations authentically and how to make their processes and culture more aligned with the impact they want to have. 

  • Why fulfillment at work comes from the inside out. 
  • The differences between purpose driven marketing and traditional marketing.
  • How to assess your supply chain and internal culture and make changes.
  • Why you’re lucky if your business is being called out.
  • How to engage your employees in meaningful storytelling.
  • Simon’s advice for brands that don’t want to appear tone deaf. 

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 22 – Caroline Duell

Episode #22 — All Good

Caroline Duell, Founder & CEO of All Good Products

In this episode, Caroline shares her journey of becoming a business owner and why her company joined 1% for the Planet from the start. She explains all the benefits that come with joining 1%, and how All Good is working to help save the coral reefs, one sunscreen application at a time. 

Coral reefs play a vital role in local economies, medicine, coastal protection, and more. However, each year more and more reefs are destroyed in part by human activities. Luckily, there are companies, like All Good Products, that are making massive strides to stop the destruction. 

Caroline Duell is the founder and CEO of All Good Products, the producer of one of the top mineral sunscreens on the market. When Caroline saw how much damage chemical sunscreens were doing to the reefs and human health, she ignited a movement. 

In this episode, Caroline shares her journey of becoming a business owner and why her company joined 1% for the Planet from the start. She explains all the benefits that come with joining 1%, and how All Good is working to help save the coral reefs, one sunscreen application at a time. 

Learn:

  • What 1% for the Planet is and how it benefits companies to join.
  • How Caroline reluctantly turned her hobby into a business.
  • Why sunscreen is a political topic. 
  • How chemical sunscreens impact our health and the health of coral reefs.
  • What hope spots are and what they all have in common.
  • How you can join the moment to save the reefs. 

Links Mentioned: 

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 21 – Miyoko Schinner

Episode #21 — Going Vegan

Miyoko Schinner, chef, restaurateur, author, and founder and owner of Miyoko’s Creamery

In this episode, Miyoko shares her story of becoming a plant-based entrepreneur and explains why going vegan is the most important lifestyle change we can make. She dives into the effects eating meat has on the planet, its species, and our health, and why vegans are the happiest people in the world. I hope this episode inspires you to look at your plate and question the impact it’s having.

Our food choices are bigger than our appetites; they impact the world. One of the most effective ways for us to stop climate change and save wildlife is by going vegan. And who better to talk to us about that than the queen of vegan cheese herself, Miyoko Schinner?

Miyoko is a serial entrepreneur, an animal lover, and a vegan advocate. An award-winning celebrity vegan chef, Miyoko has used her passion for veganism to write books, open restaurants, open animal sanctuaries, and create a phenomenal vegan cheese business. 

In this episode, Miyoko shares her story of becoming a plant-based entrepreneur and explains why going vegan is the most important lifestyle change we can make. She dives into the effects eating meat has on the planet, its species, and our health, and why vegans are the happiest people in the world. I hope this episode inspires you to look at your plate and question the impact it’s having. 

What You Will Learn:

  • The differences between being vegetarian and vegan.
  • Miyoko’s journey to veganism and what it means to be an ethical vegan.
  • The deep connection between climate change and eating animals.
  • The myths about veganism and protein.
  • How the plant-based foods industry is evolving. 
  • Why Miyoko believes 2020 was the beginning of the end of animal agriculture.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism – Episode 20 – Jennifer Cantero

Episode #20 — Sustainable Gifts for the Holidays

Jennifer Cantero, Director of Marketing & Sustainability at Sensiba San Filippo LLP

In this episode, I challenge you to give more meaningful, ethical, and sustainable gifts this year. I share gift options from some of my favorite B corp certified businesses as well as other companies that are taking steps to become more sustainable. After a year like 2020, your vote matters more than ever. Where will your dollars go this holiday season?

At the end of every show, I always say that your dollar is a ballot and you vote every day. Well, with the upcoming holidays, we have an even bigger opportunity to vote.

I want to challenge you to consider what gifts you’re giving this year and where you’re getting them from. What stories do they tell and how do they impact the world around them? Whose lives are you impacting by purchasing them?

2020 has been a rough year for all of us, not in the least for business owners. Businesses that have been around for decades are struggling, and companies that are committed to ethical and sustainable standards are committed to maintaining these standards when it would be easier not to.

In this episode, I challenge you to give more meaningful, ethical, and sustainable gifts this year. I share gift options from some of my favorite B corp certified businesses as well as other companies that are taking steps to become more sustainable. After a year like 2020, your vote matters more than ever. Where will your dollars go this holiday season?

What You Will Learn:

  • How folks have really been voting with their dollars this year.
  • How the pandemic is affecting businesses.
  • The power you have as a conscious consumer.
  • How B Corporations go the extra mile for sustainability and ethics.
  • My list of B Corp. Certified businesses to buy your gifts from this year.
  • How to find ethical businesses to shop from.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitalism Podcast – Ep 19 – Michael O'Leary and Warren Valdmanis

Episode #19 — Where Capitalism Went Wrong

Michael O’Leary and Warren Valdmanis, authors of Accountable: The Rise of Capitalism

In this episode, Michael and Warren break down where it all went wrong for capitalism and why we’re on this path today. They share the different ways they believe the system needs to be reformed in order to improve the treatment of workers and actually enforce climate initiatives. They’re taking us inside the fight to save capitalism from itself.

50% of American workers describe themselves as disengaged from their employers and 13% actively work against the interests of their employers. This isn’t due to a change in the employees, it’s due to the new direction capitalism has taken in the past 50 years.

My guests today are the authors of Accountable: The Rise of Capitalism who believe that capitalism isn’t dead or evil, it has simply misfired. Michael O’Leary and Warren Valdmanis come from different generations and hold opposing political views, but they are both committed capitalists who believe the system needs to be reformed.

By measuring the treatment of workers and the emissions produced, businesses can retain their talent while doing what they say they will do when they make statements about sustainability and their mission. But to do this well, we need to hold them accountable.

In this episode, Michael and Warren break down where it all went wrong for capitalism and why we’re on this path today. They share the different ways they believe the system needs to be reformed in order to improve the treatment of workers and actually enforce climate initiatives. They’re taking us inside the fight to save capitalism from itself.

What You Will Learn:

  • Michael and Warren’s backgrounds and why they both call themselves capitalists.
  • How capitalism started and where it misfired.
  • Where capitalism is headed if nothing changes.
  • How workers have been left behind in America by the current state of capitalism.
  • 2 things employers can do to invest in their workers.
  • Why companies can and should measure the treatment of their workers.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 18 – Laura Velez Villa

Episode #18 — Sustainable Development Goals

Laura Velez Villa, SDG Program Manager at B Lab

In this episode, Laura shares what the 17 Sustainable Development Goals are all about, what they cover, and where we are globally in our progress towards them. We talk about how everyday people can contribute to positive change and how businesses can as well through B Corp Certification.

In 2015, the UN compiled a list of goals with the deadline of 2030. These 17 goals touch on everything from poverty to equality to human rights and justice. A critical tool used to help achieve these goals is the Sustainable Development Goals Action Manager.

My guest today is Laura Velez Villa, the program manager for SDG Action Manager. Laura collaborates with the UN on working towards their 17 SDGs and recently spoke at the UN’s General Assembly to encourage leaders to accelerate their work towards these goals. 

She believes that the most important way we can progress towards these goals is by shifting to a mindset based on whys. We must make spending choices based on the negative or positive impacts, taking action informed by what matters.

In this episode, Laura shares what the 17 Sustainable Development Goals are all about, what they cover, and where we are globally in our progress towards them. We talk about how everyday people can contribute to positive change and how businesses can as well through B Corp Certification. If we want to achieve these goals by 2030, we all must do our parts, starting with voting with our dollars. 

What You Will Learn:

  • What the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals are.
  • Why these goals were developed.
  • How B Lab’s SDG Action Manager tool is helping us move towards these goals.
  • How much progress we’ve made since the goals were established in 2015.
  • Why Covid has been like an x-ray exposing fractures in our world.
  • Why Laura encourages actions that contribute to multiple goals at once. 

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 17 – Rick Rybeck

Episode #17 — Sustainable and Just Economic Development

Rick Rybeck, attorney and director of Just Economics LLC

In this episode, Rick and I talk about the purpose and benefits of user and access fees, and how private money can actually help the community and infrastructure. He’s sharing some enlightening stories of how private and public money benefitted each other and the community, and why we need to understand each parties’ stance on these issues. November is approaching, and Rick’s insights will come in handy when you’re looking over your local ballots. 

When most people think about taxes and fees, they want to know how they can pay as little as possible. What they don’t think about is how these taxes and fees could be benefiting their communities, the economy, and even their pocketbooks.

My guest today is Rick Rybeck, the director of Just Economics LLC and attorney with a master’s degree in real estate and urban development. Rick has spent over 30 years reengineering taxes, fees, and regulations for local and state governments. He specializes in assessing and updating tax and fee structures to promote job creation, affordable housing, transportation efficiency, and sustainable economic development.

Rick believes it is possible for public and private sectors to work together in a mutually beneficial way to improve communities and economies. And, understanding how each affects your community will be important come election time.

In this episode, Rick and I talk about the purpose and benefits of user and access fees, and how private money can actually help the community and infrastructure. He’s sharing some enlightening stories of how private and public money benefitted each other and the community, and why we need to understand each parties’ stance on these issues. November is approaching, and Rick’s insights will come in handy when you’re looking over your local ballots. 

What You Will Learn:

  • How Rick became an expert in sustainable economic development.
  • What user fees and access fees are and their benefits.
  • Why “just economics” isn’t an oxymoron.
  • Why how we pay for things is just as important as how much we pay.
  • Why urban sprawl is bad for our pocketbooks.
  • How Pennsylvania maintained affordable housing by reorienting their property taxes.

Links Mentioned:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 16 – Justin Dillon

Episode #16 — Modern Day Slavery in the Supply Chain

Justin Dillon, musician, author, activist, director of “Call + Response” and founder of FRDM

In this episode, Justin and I talk about how he went from rock and roll musician to anti-slavery activist. With over a decade working on this movement, Justin has a ton of experience seeing what will and won’t work to solve this problem. He shares why supply chains need a reboot, how to reboot them, and how the people that change the world are usually the least qualified. If you’re a business owner rebuilding your supply chain after COVID, his episode is a must-listen.

According to the UN, there are over 40 million estimated slaves in the world today, and 400,000 of them are in the United States. While we often think of sex trafficking when we think of slavery, many of these modern day slaves are laborers in our supply chains.

My guest today is Justin Dillon, the founder of FRDM, a social tech company working to improve supply chain transparency. Justin not only founded FRDM, but he has also directed the very popular human trafficking documentary, Call + Response, and created an amazing tool for understanding how much slavery our spending habits support, SlaveryFootprint.org. 

Justin believes that you can transform the world with transparent, resilient supply chains that protect people, the planet, and profits.

In this episode, Justin and I talk about how he went from rock and roll musician to anti-slavery activist. With over a decade working on this movement, Justin has a ton of experience seeing what will and won’t work to solve this problem. He shares why supply chains need a reboot, how to reboot them, and how the people that change the world are usually the least qualified. If you’re a business owner rebuilding your supply chain after COVID, his episode is a must-listen.

What You Will Learn from This Episode:

  • How prevalent modern day slavery is in our supply chains.
  • Justin’s journey to becoming an activist.
  • The importance of providing people with a solution, not just the problem.
  • Why the Slave Free Business Certification Act is so awesome.
  • Why rebooting the supply chain is a huge opportunity for businesses.
  • How resilient supply chains are activating tools that already exist.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 15 – John Sensiba

Episode #15 — Reimagining Compensation Structures

John Sensiba, managing partner of Sensiba San Filippo LLP

In traditional compensation structures, sales-based businesses operate with an “eat what you kill” mentality. CEOs focus on maximizing ROI instead of leading with their hearts. Lately, there has been a shift in businesses who truly care about their clients and their culture by moving away from this mentality. In this episode, John Sensiba. share the reason SSF’s compensation model was turned on its head and a better, more sustainable model was born.

In traditional compensation structures, sales-based businesses operate with an “eat what you kill” mentality. CEOs focus on maximizing ROI instead of leading with their hearts. Lately, there has been a shift in businesses who truly care about their clients and their culture by moving away from this mentality.

My guest today is the managing partner of Sensiba San Filippo, John Sensiba. John is part of the reason SSF’s compensation model was turned on its head and a better, more sustainable model was born. Although financial success is important, John believed that SSF could provide a better compensation model for its partners and employees that would actually benefit their clients more.

The compensation structure SSF adopted isn’t just for accounting firms, but for all types of sales-based businesses.

In this episode, John and I talk about the connection between compensation and a company’s culture, and how he helped create a better culture throughout the entire firm. He shares why an “eat what you kill” mentality doesn’t benefit your clients, and how the other partners and employees responded to the proposed change in compensation. Assessing your compensation structure is important for all businesses who care about longevity, culture, and sustainability.

What You Will Learn from This Episode:

  • What it means to have an “eat what you kill” mentality in business.
  • What John’s goals were in reimagining this compensation structure.
  • The importance of passion and competency when working with clients.
  • How this strategy could be used for any sales-based company.
  • That there is no finish line for sustainability in business.
  • Why businesses can’t get away with being bad actors anymore.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 14 – Robert Jones

Episode #14 — Consuming Consciously & Intentionally

Robert Jones, founder of Cause Consumer

In this episode, Robert shares his story leading up to creating Cause Consumer and what excites him about the younger generation of conscious consumers. We talk about some of the amazing social enterprises Cause Consumer has highlighted and how consumers can effectively find brands like these to shop from. Robert shares why now is the time for businesses to focus on doing good and the power of your mindset when it comes to spending.

120 million Americans will tell you that they are conscious consumers. They are willing to spend a little bit more from a company that is trying to make the world a better place. How can small businesses use this trend in consumerism to do good while making money?

My guest today, Robert Jones, is the founder of Cause Consumer, a digital magazine dedicated to telling the stories of social enterprises and the causes they support. Robert saw the societal shifts in consumer buying and the effects this new wave of conscious capitalism has had on our economy. He created Cause Consumer to foster a community among shoppers who put their money where their heart is.

One of Cause Consumer’s missions is to show people that you don’t have to spend more money to make a difference, you just have to spend more intentionally.

In this episode, Robert shares his story leading up to creating Cause Consumer and what excites him about the younger generation of conscious consumers. We talk about some of the amazing social enterprises Cause Consumer has highlighted and how consumers can effectively find brands like these to shop from. Robert shares why now is the time for businesses to focus on doing good and the power of your mindset when it comes to spending.

What You Will Learn from this Episode:

  • Robert’s history with non-profits and why he founded Cause Consumer.
  • How young people look to do good in the world compared to previous generations.
  • Why conscious consumption can be subconscious at times.
  • How Cause Consumer encourages and promotes impact spending.
  • Some of the amazing and inspiring social enterprises Cause Consumer highlights.
  • Why it’s so important for consumers to commit to spending more intentionally.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Rebooting Capitaliam Podcast – Ep 13 – Michael Whelchel

Episode #13 — Balancing Capital and Impact

Michael Whelchel, co-founder of Big Path Capital

In this episode, Michael shares his journey in the private equity field and what led him to co-found Big Path Capital. He talks about how traditional banks focus solely on transactions and closing, while most mission driven businesses have many other additional interests that are just as important. Michael gives his advice for impact companies to secure capital without sacrificing their missions and how impact investing may be the way to go.

Having the desire to make a positive impact is one of things that make mission driven businesses so great. Is it possible for these businesses to seek capital without forcing their mission to take a backseat?

My guest today, Michael Whelchel, co-founder of Big Path Capital, has a solution for companies that want to do good while making a good return. Big Path Capital is not your typical investment bank. Their clients all have a passion for creating social and environmental change as well as earning a profit.

Big Path Capital’s goals are to expand the path for businesses that are seeking multiple bottom line interests and to help the financial world generate good as it generates returns.

In this episode, Michael shares his journey in the private equity field and what led him to co-found Big Path Capital. He talks about how traditional banks focus solely on transactions and closing, while most mission driven businesses have many other additional interests that are just as important. Michael gives his advice for impact companies to secure capital without sacrificing their missions and how impact investing may be the way to go.

What You’ll Learn from this Episode:

  • • Michael’s journey from traditional investment banking to impact investing.
  • • Why traditional banks aren’t the best option for mission driven companies.
  • • How there can be both a market rate return as well as positive impact.
  • • How B Corp Certification provides companies with a roadmap.
  • • Why companies’ missions often take a backseat when capital gets involved.
  • • Michael’s advice for companies seeking investment and companies looking to sell.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Michael Whelchel LinkedIn | Big Path Capital  

Episode 12 – Nikki Lerner - Culture Coach

Episode #12 — How to Talk About Culture with Nikki Lerner

Nikki Lernerauthor, speaker and Culture Coach

In this episode, Nikki shares how leaders can bring discussions about culture and diversity into the workplace when they’re scared of messing up. She says it all starts with looking inward at your own lifestyle and working through the beliefs you’ve been ingrained with. By having these conversations, everyone on your team can feel heard, seen, and comfortable bringing their full selves to work. 

How do you talk about race and diversity with your organization? It’s a question businesses all over the country have been grappling with. Most are afraid to say the wrong thing or cause more harm than good.

My guest today, Nikki Lerner, author, speaker and Culture Coach, has an answer to that question and many others around talking about culture. Nikki coaches leaders and groups on how to facilitate these exact conversations and shows companies why talking about culture can’t be a once-a-year event. 

Before you can start this conversation with your organization, Nikki says you need to cultivate and steward your soul first. 

In this episode, Nikki shares how leaders can bring discussions about culture and diversity into the workplace when they’re scared of messing up. She says it all starts with looking inward at your own lifestyle and working through the beliefs you’ve been ingrained with. By having these conversations, everyone on your team can feel heard, seen, and comfortable bringing their full selves to work. 

What You’ll Learn from This Episode:

  • How to know if you have a monocultural or multicultural lifestyle.
  • The importance of cultivating your soul before facilitating culture discussions.
  • Why the biggest challenge of facilitating is showing that you’re trustworthy. 
  • How to get people to share during these conversations.
  • How to ensure everyone feels comfortable bringing their full selves to work.
  • Why culture needs to be part of your organization’s mission and values.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Episode #11 — Good Is the New Cool with Afdhel Aziz

Afdhel Aziz, author of Good is the New Cool: Market Like You Give a Damn and Founder of Conspiracy of Love

In this episode, Afdhel shares how marketing has the ability to reshape the world by holding up voices and making brands take a stand instead of staying quiet. While the main purpose of business is to make money, we show brands and consumers why good is the new cool and the power of purpose. 

Marketing has the ability to reshape the world by holding up voices and making brands take a stand instead of staying quiet. Afdhel Aziz is showing how businesses and consumers can aim higher when it comes to sustainability and social justice. 

My guest today is a leading expert in organizational purpose, marketing innovation, and social entrepreneurship. He’s had a 20-year global marketing career working with brands like Adidas and Absolut Vodka, and moguls such as Kanye West and Lady Gaga. 

While the main purpose of business is to make money, Afdhel shows brands and consumers why good is the new cool and the power of purpose. 

In this episode, Afdhel shares the importance of businesses having a purpose outside profit and using their platforms for good. His new book, Good is the New Cool, proposes a new model in marketing that doesn’t leave future generations disappointed by our inaction. We’re talking about coal-like advertising, accountability on social media, and how brands can embrace purpose. 

What You’ll Learn from This Episode:

  • How social media has leveled the playing field for consumers to hold brands accountable.
  • The parallels between today’s racial justice movement and the corporate environmentalism movement.
  • Why social impact is the next big disruptor in business.
  • That CEOs need to embrace purpose as a competitive advantage.
  • Why B corps are the “trim tabs” of American corporations.
  • How advertising is like the coal industry.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

Episode #10 — Doing Good Works

Jordan Bartlett and Scott Henderson, with Doing Good Works

Did you know that 50% of young people in foster care end up homeless or incarcerated after emancipation? Fostered youth are at the bottom of the resources totem pole, but these two business owners are working to change that.

Ep #10: Doing Good Works with Scott Henderson and Jordan Bartlett

Did you know that 50% of young people in foster care end up homeless or incarcerated after emancipation? Fostered youth are at the bottom of the resources totem pole, but these two business owners are working to change that.

My guests today are Scott Henderson and Jordan Bartlett, the founders of Doing Good Works, a promotional product company with a purpose. Doing Good Works is a B corp that contributes profits, time, and energy to young people in the foster care system.

Through using the power of business, this “swag with a purpose” company produces eco-conscious products while also providing work experience, mentoring, and resources to fostered youth.

In this episode, Scott and Jordan share the journey that brought them together to form this amazing company and how they use a 10-20-30 business model. We’re talking about the importance of supporting B corporations and how much good can be achieved through business. We’re discussing May being Foster Care Awareness Month and the things we can all do to improve the success rate of these youth.

What You’ll Learn from this Episode:

  • Why the failure rate for fostered youth is so high.
  • How being open to pivoting has allowed their business to grow.
  • What the 10-20-30 business model is and how it helps young people.
  • What CASA is and what it’s like to volunteer with them.
  • The importance of becoming B Corp certified and what the process was like.
  • How Scott and Jordan plan to help youth all over the country with Purpose Printery.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

andy fyfe

Episode #9 — B Corp Certified

Andy Fyfe, with B Lab

Every dollar we spend is a vote. So how can we be sure that every purchase we make (from clothing to cleaning products to bank accounts) is ethical and sustainable? By checking if the company is B Corp certified.

Every dollar we spend is a vote. So how can we be sure that every purchase we make (from clothing to cleaning products to bank accounts) is ethical and sustainable? By checking if the company is B Corp certified.

Today, I’m joined by Andy Fyfe, a senior member of B Lab’s Growth and Activation team. B Lab is a global movement of people who think businesses should focus on more than just profit. Through B Lab’s B Corp Certification, consumers know which companies put social and environmental impact before profit.

There are tons of benefits for businesses who get certified, as Andy shares, some of which are retaining talent and building loyalty. B corps even have a 63% higher survival rate than non-B corps.

In this episode, Andy talks about the origin of B Lab and why more businesses are choosing to get certified. He shares how companies can improve their scores and how startups can use the new B Pending Corp program. As consumers, if we want to make better purchasing decisions, shopping from B Corp certified companies is a great place to start.

What You’ll Learn from this Episode:

  • Why the B Corp Certification was created.
  • The difference between a B Corp and a Benefit Corp.
  • How startups can use the new Pending B Corp program.
  • How to get B Corp certified through the online assessment.
  • The many benefits of getting certified for businesses.
  • How purpose-driven businesses make an even greater impact.

Links Mentioned in the Episode:

avarna group

Episode #8 — Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Ava Holliday and Aparna Rajagopal, co-founders of The Avarna Group

In this episode, Ava and Aparna talk about the importance of companies shifting to be more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. They’re sharing how to make these changes and the benefits companies can experience if they do. These conversations aren’t easy to have, but they’re necessary if we want to reboot business and reboot capitalism.

Many workplaces in America have committed to making their companies more diverse and inclusive. While this is great, it’s not an easy feat given the unconscious bias that leaders and workers bring into the workplace. This week, I’m joined by Ava Holliday and Aparna Rajagopal, co-founders of The Avarna Group.

The Avarna Group is an organization that leads companies through the process of becoming more inclusive and diverse. Through effective DEI (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion) work, they help companies become not just more diverse for public appearances, but for the sake of their workers and work culture.

Unconscious bias runs deep in all of us depending on our backgrounds and upbringings. We bring these biases with us into the workplace. But companies that successfully implement DEI work often experience safer, more accepting workplaces and even witness more innovation.

In this episode, Ava and Aparna talk about the importance of companies shifting to be more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. They’re sharing how to make these changes and the benefits companies can experience if they do. These conversations aren’t easy to have, but they’re necessary if we want to reboot business and reboot capitalism.

What You’ll Learn in This Episode:

  • Why the power structures in capitalist businesses can be dangerous.
  • How DEI work fits into capitalism 2.0.
  • Why stand-alone DEI programs aren’t enough to make a cultural shift.
  • The first steps a company can take to improve their DEI.
  • How the hallmarks of white supremacy prevent DEI work.
  • How to be a leader of DEI in your company.

Links Mentioned in This Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Amy GotliffeEpisode #7 — Saying No to Plastic

 Amy Gotliffe, the Vice President of Conservation at the Oakland Zoo

Every day, single-use plastics enter the ecosystem and impair the lives of animals in the sea and on land. Luckily, companies with a passion for conservation are taking a stand. This week, we’re joined by Amy Gotliffe, the VP of Conservation at the Oakland Zoo.

Every day, single-use plastics enter the ecosystem and impair the lives of animals in the sea and on land. Luckily, companies with a passion for conservation are taking a stand. This week, we’re joined by Amy Gotliffe, the VP of Conservation at the Oakland Zoo. 

Zoos are expected to care about animals and their environments, but the Oakland Zoo goes above and beyond what’s expected. Through the zoo’s many initiatives, Amy and her team are committed to making this planet safer and cleaner for all species. 

Amy’s been working with the Oakland Zoo for two decades in various roles. Her passion for saying #notoplastic came from the zoo’s dedication to doing more to move the needle. She and her colleagues are constantly looking for new ways to change their zoo’s behavior, and impact how humans treat the planet.

In this episode, Amy shares the strides the Oakland Zoo is taking to reduce plastics in their environment and abroad so that we can all enjoy a cleaner planet. Although this episode was recorded before our world changed so drastically with the pandemic, many of the insights we discuss are applicable now and when this is all over. 

What You’ll Learn in This Episode:

  • The suffering and destruction caused by microplastics.
  • How our personal activities and habits affect animals everywhere.
  • Why the Oakland Zoo chooses to be a leader in conservation.
  • The ways zoos everywhere can become more eco-friendly.
  • How the Oakland Zoo is engaging the community to become part of the solution.
  • The importance of limiting or eliminating your plastic purchasing. 

Links Mentioned in This Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Mark BrownEpisode #6 — Standing in Your Truth and Trusting Your Feet 

Mark Brown, Business Coach & Author of Outward Bound Lessons to Live a Life of Leadership: To Serve, to Strive, and Not to Yield

The way we look at business leadership has been changing and will continue to change. The switch in company culture to be more empathetic has left many executives at a loss for how to adapt. This week, we’re joined by Mark Brown, executive business coach, to talk about how bosses can better lead their teams. 

The way we look at business leadership has been changing and will continue to change. The switch in company culture to be more empathetic has left many executives at a loss for how to adapt. This week, we’re joined by Mark Brown, executive business coach, to talk about how bosses can better lead their teams. 

For decades, company leaders were supposed to be the experts in their industries. They were rarely seen on the same playing field as their employees. Today, that form of leadership is no longer effective. Through leading executives on outdoor adventures, Mark Brown teaches leaders how to be lifelong learners and embrace their mountains. 

Mark’s passion for leadership development was ignited when he went on his first Outward Bound expedition at the age of 25. One of the key elements of the course was to work with what you’re given. He was taught to face his fears and learn how to make sound decisions from a place of uncertainty. 

In this episode, Mark tells us his story of embracing adventure and unpredictability to become a stronger leader. We chat about the power of thriving in adversity, the changing value of employees, and what it means to “trust your feet.”

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • The immense dissonance caused by changes in the economy.
  • How times of uncertainty can be the richest times for learning. 
  • The most important traits of an effective leader today.   
  • How to treat employees like the assets they are, not as expenses. 
  • The key questions you should ask yourself before you decide to lead.
  • What it means “To serve, to stride, and not to yield” in leadership roles. 

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Guest: Lisa CurtisEpisode #5 — Supporting Moringa Farmers Around the Globe

Lisa Curtis, CEO & Founder at Kuli Kuli Foods 

Agriculture has a huge impact on the planet – we all have to eat, after all. And while right now a lot of the impact is negative, we can use agriculture to create positive changes for the planet and the many people who support themselves by tending it. This week, we’re joined by Lisa Curtis of Kuli Kuli Foods to talk about how her company is leading the way with this approach.

Agriculture has a huge impact on the planet – we all have to eat, after all. And while right now a lot of the impact is negative, we can use agriculture to create positive changes for the planet and the many people who support themselves by tending it. This week, we’re joined by Lisa Curtis of Kuli Kuli Foods to talk about how her company is leading the way with this approach.

Kuli Kuli Foods got its start when Lisa was working in Niger as part of the Peace Corps. When she was lacking nutrition, she asked some of the women in her community what she could eat to feel better and have more energy. They introduced her to moringa, which Lisa quickly learned was packed with nutrients. What followed was a collaboration between Lisa and moringa farmers to bring the ingredient to bigger markets in a sustainable, transparent, and ethical way.

In this episode, Lisa tells us the story of Kuli Kuli Foods and how it is helping small farmers around the world access big food markets like the US. We chat about the benefits of moringa, why it’s important to form entrepreneurial partnerships that empower people around the globe, and what other food manufacturers can do if they want to invest in small share farmers, too. We also discuss regenerative agriculture and the vision for Kuli Kuli’s future. 

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • How Lisa was introduced to moringa and why the community wanted to create a market for growing it. 
  • Why moringa is a climate smart crop that benefits farmers, consumers, and the planet alike. 
  • How Kuli Kuli Foods uses language that is respectful and not patronizing to its partners in its marketing.
  • What other food manufacturers can do if they want to support small farmers and increase the demand for sustainably produced ingredients.
  • What moringa tastes like and what’s next for Kuli Kuli’s product lines.

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Guest: Lindsey WoodwardEpisode #4 — Investing in Your Financial Future and the Future of the Planet

Lindsey Woodward, Financial Advisor at Abacus Wealth Partners 

To create a sustainable future for both ourselves and our planet, we all need to put our money to good use. To talk about sustainable investing, we’re joined by Lindsey Woodward of Abacus Wealth Partners. Abacus Wealth Partners is a progressive financial services company committed to making the world a better place through investing. Abacus helps clients make the best use of their financial resources by investing in sustainable companies. 

To create a sustainable future for both ourselves and our planet, we all need to put our money to good use. Like we say every episode, your dollar is a vote – so it’s important to vote wisely. This is especially true when it comes to investing, which compounds the impact of your money powerfully over time – which makes it doubly important to invest in companies and people who are working to build a sustainable future.

To talk about sustainable investing, we’re joined by Lindsey Woodward of Abacus Wealth Partners. Abacus Wealth Partners is a progressive financial services company committed to making the world a better place through investing. Abacus helps clients make the best use of their financial resources by investing in sustainable companies. Lindsey Woodward is a Certified Financial Planner with Abacus, where she helps individuals align their values and goals with their money. 

In this episode Lindsey talks about the basics of investing and why it’s available to everyone. We also discuss how you can invest in companies that benefit people and the planet while also saving for your future. We dive into saving for retirement if you’re working for a company and how you can save even if you don’t have access to a traditional 401K. And Lindsey also runs through some of the more sustainable options for investing, how to approach your HR about making the switch to sustainable investment vehicles, and how Abacus is helping people around the country align their daily values with their financial goals. 

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • Why investing is important for everybody, whether you’re young or old, new to the workplace or heading into retirement.
  • The basics of investing and what to keep in mind when choosing different investment accounts.
  • How to invest in more sustainable investment options like ESG funds.
  • How to ask your company to make more sustainable investments.
  • What Lindsey sees for the future of sustainable investing and why it’s only going to become more commonplace and important.

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Guest: Antione AmbertEpisode #3 — Breaking New Ground with Compostable Food Packaging

Antione Ambert, Senior Director of Innovation and Sustainability of Alter Eco Foods

The issue of plastic pollution has become more acute in the past decade as we’ve all become more aware of the sheer amount of plastic ending up in our landfills and waterways. Businesses around the world are wondering how to reduce or eliminate packaging from their products, especially in the food industry where huge amounts of single-use plastic is used to protect food as its shipped all over the globe. Some companies are leading the way in revolutionizing food packaging, and we’re lucky to have one of them joining us in this episode.

The issue of plastic pollution has become more acute in the past decade as we’ve all become more aware of the sheer amount of plastic ending up in our landfills and waterways. Businesses around the world are wondering how to reduce or eliminate packaging from their products, especially in the food industry where huge amounts of single-use plastic is used to protect food as its shipped all over the globe. Some companies are leading the way in revolutionizing food packaging, and we’re lucky to have one of them joining us today. 

Antoine Ambert is the Senior Director of Innovation and Sustainability at Alter Eco Foods. Alter Eco has been creating Fair Trade and Organic food products since 2005, working with small scale farms from around the world to create excellent foods, support farmers, and benefit the planet. They have been a carbon neutral business since 2008 and turned their sights to creating compostable packaging in 2012. 

In this episode Antoine gives us an inside look at the process Alter Eco used to develop a fully compostable packaging solution for its chocolate products. We talk about why the company wanted to commit to becoming fully plastic-free by the end of 2020, some of the challenges its encountered along the way, and what it’s like to design a new type of plastic-free packaging. We also discuss the impacts of packaging on the planet and why changes are needed both upstream in the way packaging is produced and downstream in the way its recycled or composted. 

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • How and why Alter Eco became interested in developing a fully compostable packaging solution for their products.
  • What Alter Eco does to lessen their impact on the planet and support small farmers around the world.
  • The process of developing different types of compostable packaging and why it took multiple partners to make it happen.
  • Three key questions to ask when creating compostable packaging.
  • The importance of both upstream and downstream impacts of packaging on the environment.
  • What else Alter Eco is doing to have a positive impact on the planet and its partners while creating excellent products.

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Guest: Derek HansenEpisode #2 — Revolutionizing Commercial Real Estate for Sustainability and Social Impact

Derek HansenCEO and Co-Founder of Mynt Systems

We are going to dig into energy efficiency, climate change and how businesses can upgrade their building’s performance to not only make the inhabitants of that building healthier and more comfort, but lessen their carbon footprint as well as save some serious cash in the process.  

Welcome back to Rebooting Capitalism, everybody! We have another fantastic guest and topic to discuss today, and this time we’re diving a bit more into the environmental sustainability side of things. Our guest for this episode is Derek Hansen, the CEO and Co-Founder of Mynt Systems.

Mynt Systems was designed to meet the demand from many different industries for commercial energy efficiency. Mynt has taken a fragmented and confusing process and brought it under one roof, a one-stop shop for energy efficiency. They combine the assessment, engineering, design and implementation into one package that is easy to understand, financially appealing and ecologically responsible.

Mynt Systems has the ambitious goal of revolutionizing commercial real estate, and they are making their mark with big projects and impressive retrofitting efforts. Derek describes the ethos and history behind their approach, why we need ecologically sustainable and human-friendly commercial buildings, and some of the amazing technologies and strategies he and his team are implementing. Derek also talks about some of the most game-changing technologies and approaches that are coming down the pipeline, and what he’s done to enhance his personal commitment to sustainability in the last year.

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • How Derek became interested in making commercial buildings more energy efficient and sustainable.
  • Simple things that commercial building owners can do to reduce their energy and environmental impact.
  • Common challenges for making commercial buildings more energy efficient.
  • Why creating a split incentive that benefits both building owners and tenants is a key part of Mynt Systems’ strategy.
  • How making a building more energy efficient – and even turning it into an energy generator – can have a big return on investment.
  • Some of the most interesting technologies Derek has seen coming down the pipeline, and why his company is invested in big, game-changing energy projects.
  • Why the triple bottom line (planet, profit, and people) is an integral part of Mynt’s ethos.

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

Rebooting Capitalism — Guest: Kat TaylorEpisode #1 — Reforming Banking for the Greater Good

Kat TaylorCEO and Co-Founder of Beneficial State Bank

We all know the banking systems is broken. 2008 is proof of that. If we are going to reboot capitalism to work for the common good, then banking is going to have to be one of the first business sectors to rebuild their reputation and trust. Kat and I are going to dig into the history of banking, where it went wrong and what changes are needed. 

Welcome to the very first episode of Rebooting Capitalism! We are so excited to be bringing this show to you and having important conversations about capitalism, why it’s broken, and what people are doing to fix it. We have an amazing guest to kick things off with: Kat Taylor, the CEO and Co-Founder of Beneficial State Bank.

Beneficial State Bank opened in 2007 under a unique foundation ownership model and has 17 local branches throughout California, Oregon and Washington. They offer checking, savings, loans, credit cards, online and mobile banking and everything else you’d expect from a bank—but they exist to serve their customers’ prosperity and goals, not to profit from them.

In this interview, Kat Taylor talks about the history of banking, why banking needs serious reform, and how Beneficial State is creating a triple bottom-line bank that is accountable to its customers, our society, and the planet – rather than rich stakeholders. Kat shares important design decisions that form Beneficial State’s structure and ethos, and talks about why the banking sector can be a great lever for change.

What You’ll Learn in this Episode:

  • How and why business – and especially banking – can and should be harnessed as a force for positive change.
  • The history of banking in the US and why banks are distrusted by many Americans.
  • The role of banks in society and how they could help, rather than hinder, more people.
  • How Kat Taylor and Beneficial State Bank are redesigning the banking model and ownership structure.
  • How Beneficial State Bank is combatting discriminatory banking practices like redlining.
  • Why Kat believes businesses have to choose diversity consistently if we want more and different people in leadership positions throughout society.

Links Mentioned in this Episode:

The Host

Jennifer Cantero

Jennifer brings more than 20 years of business and marketing experience to her role as Director of Marketing and Sustainability at Sensiba San Filippo, California’s first and only B Corp accounting firm. She is SSF’s B Corp champion, who led the firm’s B Corporation certification process and today leads the Firm’s B Corp Practice assisting clients with their B Corp certification journeys and sustainability stories.  

Contact Jennifer

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